Scientific Program

Day 1

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS
  • Selective detection of glucose, cholesterol and urea with metal-oxide nanostructures based field-Effect transistors array biosensors

    Chonbuk National University
    South Korea
    Biography

    Yoon-Bong Hahn is Fellow of Korea Academy of Science and Technology, Director of BK21 Center for future energy materials and devices, Director of National Leading Research Lab for hybrid green energy, and Head of School of Semiconductor and Chemical Engineering, Chonbuk National University (CBNU). He joined CBNU in 1991, prior to which he worked for LG Metals Research Center from 1988 to 1991 after he received his PhD in Metallurgical Engineering from University of Utah in 1988. His main research interest is the synthesis of metal and metal oxide nanostructures and their applications for optoelectronic devices and chemical and biological sensors, resulting in over 270 peer-reviewed SCI papers and 14 patents. He co-authored six books including Metal Oxide Nanostructures and Their Applications (five volume sets) published in March 2010 by American Scientific Publishers. He also has 11 registered and nine applied patents.

    Abstract

    Nanotechnology revolution has led to the nanofabrication of sensor devices for rapid and specific identification of chemical/biological species. However, the development of multiplexed nanoscale biosensor for simultaneous detection of different analytes still remains a major challenge at the nanotechnology frontier. It is well recognized that diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder resulting in an abnormal blood glucose level and activation of several metabolic pathways related to inflammation and apoptosis events. Heart disease and stroke due to excess cholesterol in blood is the leading cause of death and disability, and kidney failure due to excess urea is caused by urea cycle disorders. We have developed metal-oxide nanostructures based, integrated field-effect transistors (FETs) array biosensor with simultaneously immobilizing GOx, ChOx and Ur enzymes on three separated FET arrays. In this lecture, we report a novel straight forward approach for simultaneous and highly selective detection of multi-alanytes (i.e., glucose, cholesterol and urea) with the FETs array biosensor without interference in each sensor response. Compared to analytically measured data, performance of the FETs array biosensor is found to be highly reliable for rapid detection of multi-analytes in mice blood, serum and blood samples of diabetic dogs. The development of an integrated, low-cost FETs array biosensor will produce quick detection under critical patient conditions, early identification of disease/disorder, and also have an enormous impact on the future generations.

  • Hybrid materials by ALD-Derived methods: Opportunities for novel material design

    CIC nanoGUNE
    Spain
    Biography

    Mato Knez studied chemistry and did his doctoral thesis in physical chemistry at the Max-Planck Institute of solid-state research in Stuttgart (Germany). In 2003 he moved for a Postdoc position to the Max-Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics in Halle (Germany), where in 2006 he received the Nanofutur award of the German ministry of education and research (BMBF) with a grant to establish a junior research group. Since 2012 he is Ikerbasque research professor in San Sebastian (Spain) and group leader of Nanomaterials at the research institute CIC nanoGUNE. In 2012, he received the prestigious Gaede prize of the German Vacuum Society

    Abstract

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) has become the method-of-choice for solving many technical issues that occurred on the way towards designing current and future electronics. Serious effort has been invested in order to optimize the materials, processes and processing instrumentation, which eventually resulted in the success story of this processing technique. The ALD process allows controlled deposition of thin films on a variety of substrates and in this way enables a modification of a given functionality of a surface or even introduction of a new functionality. It may be seen as a chemical reactor that allows precise dosing of a chemical, allowing for chemical interaction and modification of the substrate. Considering both points of view, the process opens large variation possibilities for a design of novel functional materials for emerging applications and devices. Among those functional materials hybrid materials play an increasingly important role. By bridging the worlds of polymers and ceramics the most desirable properties can be united within a singular material. Furthermore, in a well performing hybrid material the individual components will add value to their counterpart in a synergistic way. In this talk, some approaches will be discussed that show great promise for establishing ALD as the method-of-choice for innovation in technological fields beyond the microelectronics industry. In an adapted processing mode, the ALD processing technology allows infusing metals into polymeric substrates, which leads to novel material blends that cannot easily be obtained in other ways. The chemical or physical properties of the initial substrate are improved or new functionalities added. With some showcases, this talk will discuss approaches towards non-traditional application of ALD to fabricate novel materials with great promise in various applications.

  • Small is big: Magic microfluidic droplets

    University of Hong Kong
    Hong Kong
    Biography

    Prof. L. Q. “Rick” Wang received his PhD from University of Alberta (Canada) and is currently a full professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering, the University of Hong Kong. He is also the Qianren Scholar (Zhejiang) and serves as the director and the chief scientist for the Laboratory for Nanofluids and Thermal Engineering, Zhejiang Institute of Research and Innovation (HKU-ZIRI), the University of Hong Kong.

    Abstract

    Droplets of nanoliter and subnanoliter are useful in a wide range of applications, particularly when their size is uniform and controllable. Examples include biochemistry, biomedical engineering, food industry, pharmaceuticals, and material sciences. One example of their many fundamental medical applications is the therapeutic delivery system for delivering site-specific therapy to targeted organs in the body and as the carriers for newer therapeutic options. The size, the size distribution, the generation rate and the effective manipulation of droplets at a scale of nano, pico, femto and even atto liters are critical in all these applications. We make an overview of microfluidic droplet generation of either passive or active means and report a glass capillary microfluidic system for synthesizing precisely controlled monodisperse multiple emulsions and their applications in engineering materials, nanofluids, microfibers, embolic particles and colloidosome systems. Our review of passive approaches focuses on the characteristics and mechanisms of breakup modes of droplet generation occurring in microfluidic cross-flow, co-flow, flow-focusing, and step emulsification configurations. The review of active approaches covers the state-of-the-art techniques employing either external forces from electrical, magnetic and centrifugal fields or methods of modifying intrinsic properties of flows or fluids such as velocity, viscosity, interfacial tension, channel wettability, and fluid density, with a focus on their implementations and actuation mechanisms. Also included is the contrast among different approaches of either passive or active nature.

  • Bioinspired gradient micro and nanostructured surfaces with controlling of dynamic wettability

    Beihang University
    China
    Biography

    Yongmei Zheng, PhD, is a professor at School of Chemistry, Beihang University. Publications are more than 90 SCI papers included in Nature, Adv. Mater., Angew. Chem. Int. Ed., ACS Nano, Chem. Mater., J. Mater. Chem. A, etc., with 12 Cover stories, and a book “bioinspired wettability surfaces: Development in micro- and nanostructures”. Her work was highlight as scientist on News of Royal Society of Chemistry, ChemistryWorld in 2014 with topic of spider silk and bufferfly wings. She is senior member of Chinese Composite Materials Society (CSCM), American Chemistry Society (ACS), Fellow member of NANOSMAT Society, International Society of Bionic Engineering (ISBE), International Association of Advanced Materials (IAAM), and Editorial board member of Scientific Report in nature. She wins an ISBE outstanding contribution award in 2016 by ISBE, in Ningbo of China, and also an IAAM award Medal in 2016 by IAAM, in Sweden, due to the notable and outstanding contribution in field of "Advanced Materials Science and Technology".

    Abstract

    Biological surfaces create the enigmatical reality to be contributed to learning of human beings. They cooperate between endlessly arranged various-style gradient micro- and nanostructures (MN) that greatly provide with excellent functions via natural evolvement. Such biological surfaces with multi-gradient micro- and nanostructures display unique wetting functions in nature for water collection and water repellency, which have inspired researchers to design originality of materials for promising future. In nature, a combination of multiple gradients in a periodic spindle-knot structure take on surface of spider silk after wet-rebuilding process in mist. This structure drives tiny water droplets directionally toward the spindle-knots for highly efficient water collection. Inspired by the roles of gradient MNs in the water collecting ability of spider silk, a series of functional fibers with unique wettability has been designed by various improved techniques such as dip-coating, fluid-coating, tilt-angle coating, electro-spun and self-assembly, to combine the Rayleigh instability theory. The geometrically-engineered thin fibers display a strong water capturing ability than previously thought. The bead-on-string hetero structured fibers are capable of intelligently responding to environmental changes in humidity. Also a long-range gradient-step spindle-knotted fiber can be driven droplet directionally in a long range. An electro spun fiber at micro-level can be fabricated by the self- assembly wet-rebuilt process, thus the fiber displays strong hanging-droplet ability. The temperature or photo or roughness-responsive fibers can achieve a controlling on droplet driving in directions, which contribute to water collection in efficiency. Besides, inspired by gradient effects on butterfly wing and lotus leaves, the surfaces with ratchet MN, flexible lotus-like MN are fabricated successfully by improved methods, which demonstrate that the gradient MN effect rises up distinctly anti-icing, ice-phobic and de-ice abilities. These multifunctional materials can be designed and fabricated for promising applications such as water-collecting, anti-icing, anti-frosting, or anti-fogging properties for practical applications in aerospace, industry and so on.

  • Improved SWIR photo-Detection in the context of sub-Wavelength structuration

    University of Paris-Saclay
    France
    Biography

    Jean-Luc Pelouard is a French Physicist and Researcher. His achievements include research of feasibility of InP-based heterojunction bipolar transistors and; development of first InAPGaAs/InGaAs heterojunction bipolar transistor. he is currently a Research Scientist at C2N - CNRS where she conducts research in the field of optics, active plasmonics, and Nano-photonics.

    Abstract

    The extreme light confinement provided by sub-wavelength metal-dielectric structures pushes towards revisiting the design rules of the photo-detectors. Furthermore, introducing absorbing layers in optical nano-resonators demands a dedicated electromagnetic design. Developing together semiconducting heterostructures and optical nano-antennas opens the way for performance improvements and new functionalities, introducing very promising features such as ultra-thin absorbing layers and device area much smaller than its optical cross-section. High responsivity, high-speed behavior, and carved optical response are among the expected properties of this new generation of photo-detectors. In this talk, I present a GMR InGaAs photo-detector dedicated for FPA applications as an illustration of this global design. I discuss the cross-linked properties of the optical and semiconductor structures. Experimental results show at ?=1.55 ?m an EQE of 75% and a specific detectivity of 1013 cm?Hz.W-1.

  • Acousto-Magneto-Plasmonics for future applications in nanophotonics

    University of Maine
    USA
    Biography

    Vasily Temnov has obtained his PhD from University Duisburg-Essen in 2004. After Post-doctoral studies at Dortmund Technical University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, he became a CNRS Researcher at Institute des Molécules et Matériaux du Mans in Le Mans in 2011, where he also obtained a Habilitation degree in 2012. Being the recipient of numerous academic awards by the CNRS, DAAD and the Humboldt Foundation, he served as a Coordinator of an international network on the nonlinear nano photonics “NNN-Telecom” as well as several French-German ANR-DFG and French-Russian CNRS-RFBR collaborative research projects.

    Abstract

    Acousto-magneto-plasmonics deals with experimental and theoretical investigations of interactions between the acoustic, magnetic and plasmonic transients in hybrid metal ferromagnet multilayer structures excited by ultra-short laser pulses. The main focus is on understanding the novel aspects of acoustic dynamics in materials as well as the peculiarities in the nonlinear optical and magneto-optical response in nano-scaled structures. For example, the nonlinear optical detection is illustrated in details by probing the static magneto-optical second harmonic generation in gold-cobalt-silver tri-layer structures in Kretschmann geometry. Furthermore, we show experimentally how the nonlinear reshaping of giant ultra-short acoustic pulses propagating in gold can be quantified by time-resolved plasmonic interferometry and how these ultra-short optical pulses dynamically modulate the optical nonlinearities. An effective medium approximation for the optical properties of hybrid multilayers enables the understanding of novel optical detection techniques. Exploring acousto-magneto-plasmonic functionalities at the nano-scale provide the experimental platform for designing the next-generation ultrafast nano photonic devices. As the next step, functionalizing hybrid metal-ferromagnet multilayer structures with solid-state nano-scale light emitters will allow for detailed quantum-optical studies of magneto-plasmonic interactions at the nano-scale using nonlinear optical and quantum-optical techniques. From an even more fundamental perspective, combining graphene-based plasmonic nanostructures with optical metamaterials may shade light on the mysteries of topological plasmonics.

  • Light emission based on electrically-Fed nanogap optical antennas

    University of Paris-Saclay
    France
    Biography

    Claire Deeb has completed her PhD from University of Technology of Troyes, France and Post-doctoral research from Argonne National Laboratory, USA and Northwestern University, USA. She is currently a Research Scientist at C2N - CNRS where she conducts research in the field of optics, active plasmonics, and nano-photonics. She is collaborating with leading groups at UIUC (IL, USA) and LMU-Munich and has led many international projects. She has given 11 invited talks and has published over 13 papers and one book chapter. Additionally, she has received two PhD awards and has been serving as an Editorial Board Member of PNN.

    Abstract

    Gaps formed between metal surfaces control the coupling of localized plasmons, thus allowing gap-tuning targeted to exploit the enhanced optical fields for different applications. Classical electrodynamics fails to describe this coupling across sub-nm gaps, where quantum effects become important owing to non-local screening and spill-out of electrons. The advantages of narrow gap antennas have mostly been demonstrated for processes like SERS that are excited optically, but promising new phenomena appear when such antennas are fed by electric generators. However, the extreme difficulty of engineering and probing an electrically driven optical nanogap antenna has limited experimental investigations of physical concepts at stake in these conditions. The feasibility of structuring electron-fed antennas as nano-light sources has been recently demonstrated; however, this configuration remains very limited, too much power was lost as heat when operating the optical antenna, and the antenna operation time was limited by the structure lifetime to sustain a bias voltage for a few hours. The innovative structure that we suggest here will cope with all these limitations: ALD dielectric materials substitute the air gap to improve the antenna stability; a quantum efficiency of 10-1 is targeted owing to a significantly efficient antenna (2 orders of magnitude higher field enhancement). The resulting source will operate at room temperature and have a tunable spectral response (ranging from visible frequencies to THz regime) defined by the antenna geometry and the applied bias. Also, this source will be compact, Si-compatible, and will not request specific emitting materials (e.g. III-V semi-conductors) to operate.

  • Nanofiber technology for 3D nano-Biointerface fabrication and cellular engineering

    Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria
    Spain
    Biography

    Dr Chen has completed her PhD in 2008 from Aarhus University and is currently an Assistant Professor at Department of Engineering, Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO), Aarhus University in Denmark, and visiting assistant professor at Stanford University School of Medicine. She leads the research group of Nanofiber Technology and Cellular Engineering, and has published more than 50 peer-reviewed papers in reputed journals.

    Abstract

    The significance of the overall fibrillar and porous nanoscale topography of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in promoting essential cellular processes has led to consideration of biomaterials with nanofibrous features. Of the many methods for fabricating fibers with micrometer and nanometer diameters, electrospinning is simplest, most straightforward and cost-effective. Fibers are produced by forcing a polymer melt or solution through a spinneret in the presence of a high electric field. This approach becomes intriguingly powerful when remarkable morphological features such as very large surface area to volume ratio and porosity are combined with unique chemical, physical, or mechanical functionalisation by adding desired components with ease and control. Our current research focuses on exploring new possibilities to fabricate three-dimensional Nano-biointerfaces that recapitulate the in vivo environment. The developed biocompatible, therapeutics-incorporated nanofibers synergise the nanostructural induction and the bioactives signalling to affect cellular behaviours, such as gene knockdown, cell adhesion and migration, proliferation and stem cell differentiation. The biomimetic nanofibers that are responsive to different stimuli, such as temperature, pH, light, and electric/magnetic field were also developed for on-demand therapeutic delivery and intervention.

Advanced Nanomaterials | Nano Particles| Material science | Nanostructures | Nanomaterials
Chair
  • Allied Academies Nanotechnology 2018 Chair Speaker Jan Weyher photo
    Jan Weyher
    Institute of High Pressure Physics - Polish Academy of Sciences
    Poland
Co-Chair
Speaker
  • Deformation rate dependence of atomic force microscope based nanomechanical measurements
    Speaker
    Samuel Lesko
    Bruker Nano GmbH
    France
    Biography

    Samuel Lesko completed his PhD in Physics based on study by AFM of fundamental colloidal forces in cement, Burgundy University, France. He is currently working as an Applications manager for Europe, Middle East and Latin America for Bruker, Nano Surfaces Division, and Based at Paris, France. He was having more than 20 years’ experience in AFM covering material science and biology applications.

    Abstract

    The mechanical properties and extent of sub-micron features in polymer blends and composites are of interest due to their influence on macroscopic material performance. Atomic force microscopy is a natural tool to study these materials due to its high resolution and its ability to directly probe the mechanical properties of the sample. Over the past two decades, AFM based mechanical property mapping techniques have evolved from slow force volume to much faster dynamic measurements using TappingMode and contact resonance. Recently, real-time control of the peak force of the tip-sample interaction has led to a fundamental change in AFM imaging, providing force-volume-like quantitative mapping of mechanical properties at reasonable scan rates and very high resolution, even on soft materials. During material property mapping, the time scale of tip-sample interaction now spans from microseconds to seconds, tip sample forces can be controlled from piconewtons to micronewtons, and spatial resolution can reach sub-nanometer. This has enabled AFM to become a unique mechanical measurement tool having large dynamic range (1 kPa to over 300 GPa in elastic modulus) with the flexibility to integrate with other physical property characterization techniques. In addition to elastic and plastic properties, researchers have begun to take advantage of the wide range of deformation rates accessible to AFM in order to study time dependent properties of materials such as viscoelasticity. More traditional measurements with indentation DMA are usually limited in frequency to a few 100 Hz and have limited spatial resolution. In contrast, AFM measurements can extend from less than 1 Hz to kHz and beyond while retaining the high resolution needed to see the details in distribution of properties near domain boundaries in nanocomposites and thin films. This presentation will review this recent progress, providing examples that demonstrate the dynamic range of the measurements, and the speed and resolution with which they were obtained. Additionally, the effect of time dependent material properties on the measurements will be discussed.

  • Nanoelectronics based on ultra-Robust metal-Terpyridine oligomer films and chemical or optical molecular switches
    Speaker
    Wrochem Florian
    Sony Europe GmbH
    Germany
    Biography

    Florian Von Wrochem is a Principal Scientist and Project Leader at Materials Science Laboratory of Sony Corporate labs (Stuttgart, Germany). He received his PhD in Physics from the University of Basel in 2007 in parallel with his R&D activities at the Sony Europe. The research in his group is addressing the development of novel organic and molecular electronic devices, e.g. memories and logic circuits for flexible electronics. These activities involve the fabrication and electrical characterization of organic opto-electronic devices at the nano and micro scale, the spectroscopic and topographic investigation of surfaces and interfaces, as well as the design and synthesis of functional materials.

    Abstract

    Considerable efforts have been undertaken within the past decades to shift organic-based thin-film devices to the application level. However, a major obstacle is given by the thermal deposition of metal electrodes, which remained elusive due to the damage and the electrical shorts experienced by the fragile molecular layers. Here, we show that large area molecular junctions of outstanding electronic properties and robustness can be realized using densely packed molecular wires consisting of FeII-terpyridine complex oligomers. Surprisingly, these ultrathin oligomer-based devices are stable for over 2 years under regular current-voltage cycling, withstanding a wide range of temperatures (150-360 K) and applied voltages (3 V), so, offering a perspective to a robust platform for molecular electronics. In the second part of the talk, we demonstrate switching materials for memory applications by means of two different approaches – a chemical and a biochemical – to ultrathin molecular switching layers. In the first system, remarkable resistive switching has been obtained with tetraaniline layers and tetraaniline/PEDOT blends, switched by proton doping, to yield on/off ratios of up to 105. In the second approach, we make use of Sn-cyt c protein layers to show that they act as reversible and highly efficient photo-electrochemical switches, even upon integration into large area solid state junctions. Photocurrents are observed both in the Soret-band (?=405 nm) and in the Q-band (?=535 nm), with current on/off ratios reaching values of up to 25, so making protein photo detectors a realistic scenario.

  • AFM characterization of the physicochemical properties and activity of single protein molecules CYP 102A1 (BM3)
    Speaker
    Yuri Ivanov
    Institute of Biomedical Chemistry
    Russia
    Biography

    Yuri D. Ivanov was born in Alexin, Russia, in 1959. He graduated from the Moscow Engineering Physical Institute (MEPHI) in 1982. He received his PhD in Physics from the MEPHI in 1988 and Dr Sci. in Biol. from the Institute of Biomedical Chemistry RAMS (Moscow) in 2000. From 2000 to present he has been a head of laboratory of nanobiotechnology at the Institute of Biomedical Chemistry RAMS. His current research interest is nanotechnology approaches for the investigation of protein complexes.

    Abstract

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a nano-technological multifunctional molecular platform for measuring of physicochemical and functional properties of single proteins molecules. AFM was used for visualization of oligomeric state, activity, elasticity and electron transfer of single molecules of CYP 102A1 (BM3). It was shown that BM3 in water solution exists as monomer, dimer, trimer, tetramer and oligomers of higher order by use sharp and super sharp AFM probes. Functional activity of single monomers and oligomers of BM3 was measured by AFM. The height BM3 fluctuations amplitude during catalytic cycle is much larger than the height fluctuations amplitude of the enzyme molecules in the resting state. It was found that an average amplitude of height oscillations of P450 BM3 molecule of dimers during catalytic cycle increased up to 5.0±2Å*s-1 that was 2.5 times larger than an average amplitude of P450 BM3 height oscillations in the resting state. It was obtained that the height fluctuation amplitude of single globule of cytochrome P450 BM3 depends on temperature, and 22?C is a peak of this temperature profile. Mass spectrometry (MS) measurements were used to obtain a time course of a hydroxylation product of lauric acid oxidation during the enzymatic reaction of P450 BM3 in two cases: when enzyme was solubilized in the volume and when it was immobilized on the AFM chip. In both cases the number of enzyme molecules was ? 1010, and the kinetics was linear during the first 10 minutes. It was shown that in the case of solubilized enzyme kcat=10-3 s-1, and in the case of immobilized enzyme kcat=0.4*10-3 s-1 that was 2.5 times less than the first one. Elasticity of single protein was measured based on deformation of this protein under AFM probes with various radii of curvature. Young’s modulus of BM3 molecules depends on AFM modes. Based on the obtained data, the following conclusions may be made: the enzyme catalytic activity of single molecules can be measured as amplitude of enzyme globule fluctuations.

Young Researchers Forum (YRF)
Speaker
  • Preparation and study on radar absorbing materials of epoxy-Fe3O4 composites and the influence of PANI on microwave absorbing properties of NiFe2O4/PVB composites
    Speaker
    Yuksel Akinay
    Karabuk University
    Turkey
    Biography

    Yuksel Akinay is a Research Assistant at Materials Research and Development Center of Karabük University, Turkey. He obtained his Bachelor’s degree from Metallurgical and Material Engineering Department, University of Y?ld?z Technical University, Istanbul, Turkey, in 2010. He has a PhD degree. His research interests include polymer composite materials, nanocomposite, electromagnetic wave absorbing and micro-structure characterization.

    Abstract

    Microwave absorption properties of epoxy matrix with magnetite fillers were investigated in this work. The composite were prepared via ultrasonic probe sonicator method in solution. The complex permittivity and permeability for epoxy matrix magnetite fillers radar absorbing composites were measured at different microwave frequencies via vector network analyzer. The obtained results describe the frequency dependence of permittivity and permeability with various powder percentage and composite thickness. The reflection loss (RL) of composites was calculated and evaluated from complex permittivity and permeability. The obtained results show that both composites exhibit the large RL and broadband within the frequency range from 1 to 14 GHz for different thickness. The results show that absorption has increased as the fillers rate increase and thickness is decreased. This can be understood based on quarter-wave principle within the frequency range from 1 GHz-14 GHz for different thickness.

  • Maintaining biomolecules native conformation upon surface immobilization and extracting their size and shape: A study employing the QCM-D biosensor
    Speaker
    Dimitra Milioni
    Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology - FRTH
    Greece
    Biography

    Dimitra Milioni obtained her Diploma in Applied Physics at NTUA, Athens, Greece. She completed her MSc in Molecular and Cellular Biophysics at Pierre et Marie Curie University (Paris VI, France) and PhD in Biophysics at the same University in 2012. After spending some months as Visiting Researcher in Molecular Modeling and Drug Design Laboratory, she is a Post-doctoral Researcher in Biosensors Lab at Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas-IMBB-FORTH, Greece. Her scientific interests focus on “Biosensors, plasma membrane and model membranes as well as on their interaction with other biomolecules (biocompatible polymers, pore-forming toxins and antimicrobial peptides) and drug delivery”.

    Abstract

    Studying bio-molecular conformation is of extremely great importance in the fields of biology and nano-biotechnology. The ability to maintain and study the biomolecule’s native conformation is crucial, as the latter is directly related to the molecule’s properties and functions. For this purpose, in this work we used anchors for immobilizing different biomolecules on an acoustic biosensor surface via single-point attachment. The biosensor response provides information directly related to the geometrical features of the probed molecule. More precisely, we used the Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) technique; as an acoustic wave propagates through a medium containing the molecules of interest, any change occurring in its characteristics, such as the propagation frequency (F) and the energy dissipation (D), can be linked to changes in the concentration and/or the conformation of the biomolecules bound on the surface. The scientific principle behind the new approach described here is that the acoustic ratio (?D/?F) is a measure of the hydrodynamic volume of the attached entity, mathematically expressed by its intrinsic viscosity [?]. We have already used this approach for diagnostic purposes, including detection of SNPs or targets of different lengths in real samples. Here, we expand this methodology by specifically attaching discrete biomolecules on the biosensor surface using DNA molecules as single point and variable length anchors. The native conformation of the biomolecules is thus maintained and their conformation, i.e. shape and length, is correctly predicted through acoustic measurements.

  • Investigation of the effect of indium and arsonic on the photoluminescence properties of in GaPN and GaAsPN solar cel
    Speaker
    Hind Albalawi
    University of Nottingham
    United Kingdom
    Biography

    Hind Albalawi is a PhD Researcher at University of Nottingham, UK. She completed her MSc in Renewable Energy and Architecture at Nottingham University, UK. She is working mainly on semiconductors for solar cells.

    Abstract

    Concentrated multi-junction solar cells (MJSC) which are grown by either molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) or metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE) have the highest efficiencies of photovoltaic (PV). The optical properties of both bulk GaAsPN and InGaPN, which are grown on GaP have been investigated using photoluminescence (PL) for solar cell applications and compared with that of GaPN layers. The target energy has to be reached is 1.7~1.8 eV for solar cells. InGaPN shows a great PL intensity at this energy under 140K. Indeed, S-shape was observed which is mainly due to the fluctuation of band gap energy related to In and N content. In contrast, GaAsPN presents lower intensity at the same conditions. GaAsPN presented poor behaviour at room temperature. Rapid thermal annealing (RTA) under 800 °C for 5 minutes was done to both samples to carry out the effect of it. RTA helps to treat the PL intensity by improve it but the energy peak is red shifted.

  • Multiple hot spots 3D nanostructures: Ultrasensitive substrates for surface-Enhanced raman spectroscopy
    Speaker
    Andrea Cerea
    University of Genova
    Italy
    Biography

    Andrea Cerea is currently pursuing his PhD at University of Genoa and the Italian Institute of Technology. He is working in the Plasmon Nanotechnology Group, with focus on the development of photonic metamaterials for electromagnetic field manipulation.

    Abstract

    Over the last few years, great efforts have been made in order to increase the performances of sensors down to ultralow concentrations (10-15 ?) of analyte molecules, with exceptional consequences in the fields of photonics, nonlinear optics and imaging. Within this context, Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) provides label-free detection of analytes down to the single-molecule level with high specificity and sensitivity. Conventional and cost-effective approaches exploit bottom-up techniques for the realization of large SERS substrates with a random and high density distribution of active sites, also called hot spots. Complementary strategies employ top-down methods, which allow the realization of high uniformity SERS active surfaces with precise control over the position, size and shape of the hot spots. By taking advantage of the interaction between analyte molecules and enhanced optical near-fields in the vicinity of resonantly excited plasmonic nanostructures, plasmon-based devices represent a good candidate for SERS. Here, we present the realization and experimental characterization of 3D multi-branched nanostructures as a viable strategy for intense electric hot-spot generation and SERS applications. Our structures, arranged in isolated or coupled configuration, support intense localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) with an associated giant electromagnetic (EM) field confinement and enhancement factors up to 108. Further developments of our 3D nanostructures have led to the realization of bimetallic Au/Ag nanostructures with a multi-branched geometry. This novel architecture integrates the advantages of extremely high EM field enhancement, owing to the plasmonic properties of Ag, with the excellent biocompatibility and chemical stability provided by the single metal Au analogue. Moreover, the present layout can support large hot spots densities comparable to those obtained with bottom-up techniques, although with greater reproducibility and precise control over the spatial location of the active areas.

Day 2

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS
  • Targeting the reprogrammed energy generation system of cancer cells

    Bar-Ilan University
    Israel
    Biography

    Prof. Uri Nir leads the "Cancer and Inflammatory diseases" research lab in the Faculty of Life- Sciences at Bar-Ilan University, Israel. Between the years 2010-2014 Prof. Nir served as the dean of the Faculty. Nir gained his PhD degree from the Weizmann Institute of Sciences in Israel. He then went for a post-doctoral training in the "Hormone-Research Institute" at the University of California San-Francisco, CA., USA. Since 1988 Prof. Nir is a faculty member in the Faculty of Life-Sciences at Bar-Ilan University. The main research interest of the Nir's group is: implementation of nano-technology in the development of new anti-cancer formulations.

    Abstract

    The aspiration to achieve efficacious cancer targeted therapy involves intense global R&D efforts. Blockage of fundamental processes like the unique reprogramed energy generation system of malignant cells, combined with a nano-technology approach, should offer new tools for efficient interference with cancer progression. While deciphering the energy generation systems of cancer cells, we found that two related enzymes (kinases), termed Fer and FerT, which normally reside in the cell energy power-station-mitochondria of sperm cells, are harnessed to the reprogrammed mitochondria of cancer cells. Both enzymes potentiate the generation of energy by mitochondria in cancer cells subjected to stress conditions like nutrient and oxygen deprivation. This enabled the survival of cancer cells under harsh conditions which are prevalent in solid tumors. To translate these findings into a novel anti-cancer therapy we have combined, synthetic-chemistry, robotic, and high throughput screening approaches, for the development of a synthetic low molecular weight compounds which binds and inhibit the kinase activity of both Fer and FerT. Such a compound termed E260 was then formulated and incorporated into nano-micelles to selectively target Fer and FerT in the mitochondria of malignant cells. Notably, the formulated E260 compound selectively perturbs mitochondrial functioning in malignant cells thereby imposing energy crisis and consequent necrotic death in cancer but not in normal cells. The anti-cancer potency of the E260 formulation is also manifested using human tumors derived-xenografts models in mice, thus portraying it as a new potential anti-cancer drug.

  • Wetting of water on graphene

    University of Amsterdam
    Netherlands
    Biography

    Daniel Bonn completed his PhD in University of Amsterdam, Dept. of Chemistry in 1993 and MSc in University of Amsterdam, Dept. of Chemistry, and M.Sc. in Physical Chemistry in 1990. Since 2003 he has worked as a Professor of Physics (part-time) at the van der Waals-Zeeman Institute, University of Amsterdam. Current research interests in Complex fluids, rheology, glasses, surface phase transitions, instabilities, and turbulence. Over 90 publications in refereed journals, 3 invited review articles, over 20 invited lectures at international conferences, co-organizer of two conferences

    Abstract

    In contemporary literature, the wetting properties of graphene have proven to be controversial and difficult to assess; especially, whether the presence of a thin molecular layer such as graphene influences the adhesion of a solid phase. In this work, we directly measure the water adsorption in graphene nano-powder flakes of different thicknesses in a novel experimental approach, which shows that the thinnest of graphene flakes do not adsorb water. Thicker flakes of graphene nano-powder, on the other hand, do adsorb water. Calculation of the van der Waals interactions in this system confirms that the adhesive interactions between graphene and water are very weak, which makes graphene super hydrophobic. Subsequent ‘liquid marble’ tests with graphene nano-powder flakes establish this super hydrophobicity. Our work affirms the much debated ‘wetting transparency’ property of graphene, implying that a single graphene layer on top of a substrate does not affect the adhesion between a wetting phase and the substrate.

  • Technology of nano-Structuring of GaN for surface enhanced raman spectroscopy (SERS) measurements

    Institute of High Pressure Physics - Polish Academy of Sciences
    Poland
    Biography

    J L Weyher has completed his PhD at Military Academy of Technology in Warsaw, Poland and received Habilitation at University of Montpellier in France in 1995. He is an Associate Professor at Institute of High Pressure Physics in Warsaw. He has published more than 200 papers in reputed journals.

    Abstract

    It is commonly accepted that the presence of so-called hot-spots is necessary for obtaining high enhancement factor (EF) of Raman signal from individual molecules attached to the plasmonic metal particles. It was experimentally confirmed that organic (biological, chemical) molecules located at hot-spots contribute most significantly to the overall surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy measurements (SERS) intensity. Two approaches are usually used in order to deliver SERS platforms, namely planar and nano-structured substrates, both with plasmonic metal particles on the top surface. It has been shown experimentally that 3D SERS substrates are more efficient for SERS measurements compared with planar substrates. The aim of this presentation is to demonstrate the technology of nano-structuring of hetero-epitaxial GaN substrates using different (photo)-etching methods as well as tailoring of plasmonic metal surfaces for increased SERS efficiency. Highly rough and stable GaN surface are formed by defect-selective photo-etching of GaN layers containing dislocations. The resultant nano-pillars contribute to the formation of hot-spots and high EF. It will be shown that orthodox etching yielding well developed pits also leads to the formation of hot-spots and EF up to 10E6 for the examined test molecules of para-mercaptobenzoic acid (pMBA). The efficiency of SERS platforms can also be tailored by chemical treatment (dealloying) of sputtered alloyed metal layer of Au-Ag and Au-Cu and by thermal treatment leading to recrystallization of metal clusters. The novel SERS platforms based on etched GaN show very good mechanical and chemical stability and high EF up to 10E7. This feature enabled time-lapse measurements of various biological systems such as Hepatitis B virus antigen and DNA and recently of different bacteria (BC, BT, and BS).

  • Nanoscale engineering of plasmonic materials for biosensing

    Imperial College London
    United Kingdom
    Biography

    Fang Xie is a Senior Lecturer in Department of Materials, Imperial College London. She is also Deputy Director. She has expertise in functional nanomaterials including metal, semiconducting, and oxide nanomaterials synthesis, as well as the applications of the functional materials in energy and life sciences. Her current research interests include plasmonic nanostructures for efficient light harvesting for solar cells and solar fuels, as well as in ultrasensitive biosensing and bio-imaging applications. She has over 50 publications including five patents.

    Abstract

    Early diagnosis plays an increasingly significant role in current clinical drive. Detection, identification, and quantification of low abundance biomarker proteins form a promising basis for early clinical diagnosis and offer a range of important medical benefits. Amplification of light from NIR fluorophores by coupling to metal nanostructures, i.e. Metal Induced Fluorescence Enhancement (MIFE), represents a promising strategy for dramatically improving the detection and quantification of low abundance biomarker proteins, and potentially increase already sensitive fluorescence based detection by up to three orders of magnitude. The amplification of the fluorescence system is based on interaction of the excited fluorophores with the surface plasmon resonance in metallic nanostructures. The enhanced fluorescence intensity due to the existence of metal nanostructures makes it possible to detect much lower levels of biomarkers tagged with fluorescence molecules either in sensing format or for tissue imaging. The first part of my talk will focus on some recent developments of plasmonic metal nanostructures by both top-down and bottom up methods. I will then discuss the prepared plasmonic nanostructures in the applications of biosensing.

Nano photonics | Nanomedicine | Nano Science and Technology | Applications of Nanotechnology | Nano Electronics
Chair
Co-Chair
Speaker
  • Electrical properties of single ZnO nanowires prepared by wet and dry methods
    Speaker
    Andreea Costas
    National Institute of Materials Physics
    Romania
    Biography

    Costas A has completed her PhD at University of Bucharest, Romania. She is a young Researcher with 10 publications that have been cited over 20 times, and her publication H-index is four. She is currently working as a Researcher at National Institute of Materials Physics and she is involved as a team member in more than five national research projects.

    Abstract

    In the last decades, nanowires have become the building blocks for new nanotechnology devices. Compared to bulk materials, nanowires have high aspect ratio and unique electrical, optical and magnetic properties that can be easily tuned by controlling the parameters involved in the growth process. ZnO is an n type semiconductor material with a direct wide band gap (3.3 eV) and a large exciting binding energy (60 meV) that crystallizes in two main phases, hexagonal wurtzite and cubic zinc blende. ZnO nanowires are the perfect candidates for many applications, such as gas sensor, light-emitting diodes, field effect transistors, photo-detectors, photocatalysts, solar cells and many others. In this work, arrays of ZnO nanowires have been prepared using wet and dry methods (electrochemical deposition, chemical bath deposition and thermal oxidation in air). The structural (X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy), optical (reflection, photoluminescence), morphological (scanning electron microscopy), compositional (energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy) and electrical properties (current-voltage characteristics) were investigated in order to increase their performance in different applications. By employing lithographic techniques (photolithography and electron beam lithography) and thin films deposition techniques, single ZnO nanowires prepared by wet and dry methods, were integrated into devices like field effect transistors. We observed that the growth method influence the structural, morphological, optical and electrical properties of the nanowires. Thus, the method used to synthesize the nanowires represents the key in obtaining high performance electronic devices.

  • Electrical properties of single core-Shell metal oxide nanowires
    Speaker
    Camelia Florica
    National Institute of Materials Physics
    Romania
    Biography

    Florica C has completed her PhD at University of Bucharest, Romania. She is a young researcher with over 25 publications that have been cited over 75 times, and her publication H-index is 5. She is currently leading a national research project on the topic of core-shell nanowires.

    Abstract

    Metal oxide materials are the focus of many researchers being often used due to their abundance in nature and low environmental impact. Topics have been going recently towards the nanoscale because of the diverse, yet unique characteristics given by the low dimensions together with reducing the amount of employed material. The particular properties of nanowires make them suitable for applications such as high sensitivity sensors, catalysis, power generators, etc. ZnO nanowires have a high surface to volume ratio and exhibit special electrical properties with applications in field effect transistors, diodes. However, they are interacting with the surroundings, even dissolving in the presence of more acidic environment and in order to affect this occurrence a shell material is proposed. The ZnO nanowires are prepared by thermal oxidation in air at 500°C on zinc foils and on top of it a thin layer of CuO is deposited by magnetron sputtering. The structural, morphological, optical and electrical properties of the prepared nanowires are investigated before and after the shell deposition. Moreover, the nanowires were transferred in alcohol and single nanowires were contacted using photolithography and e-beam lithography and their electrical response was measured at various temperatures. Differences between the bare ZnO nanowires and their core-shell counterparts are evidenced.

Poster Presentations
Speaker
  • Dyes degradation by using M° nano particles incorporated in SiO2 matrix
    Speaker
    Liraz Kuztashi
    Ariel University
    Israel
    Biography

    Liraz Kuztashi completed her BSc in Chemical Engineering department at Ariel University (2015). Her research is focused on nanoparticles and development of new processes for wastewater treatment.

    Abstract

    In recent years, with the growth of population and the development of social economy, the discharged amounts of various pollutants are also growing rapidly. Especially, the pollutants caused by textile dyes and other industrial dyestuffs on water pollution have severe implications on aquatic environment and human health. Therefore, it has begun to pay more attention to the problem of water pollution, and prevention of water deterioration and the protection of water resources have become a common human goal. In this work, the sol gel synthesis route has been utilized for the preparation of SiO2 matrices embedded with Ag0 and Au0 nanoparticles for their application as heterogeneous catalysts in the reduction of Methyl Orange (MO) as a model pollutant compound. The M0-NPs were prepared by reduction of silver nitrate or gold (III) chloride trihydrate with NaBH4 during the sol-gel process. Different preparation procedures were examined in order to determine the preferred method for obtaining a suitable matrix for the catalysis. Our purposely synthesized supported noble metal nanoparticles degrade methyl orange by sodium borohydride satisfactorily and the efficiency of our catalysts is not differed through first to fifth use.

  • Study the nickel concentration effect in electro deposition solution on performance of nano Pt-Ni/Ni electrodeposited electro catalyst for methanol oxidation reaction in alkaline media
    Speaker
    Rasol Abdullah Mirzaie
    Shahid Rajaee Teacher Training University
    Iran
    Biography

    Rasol Abdullah Mirzaie received PhD degree in Physical Chemistry from Tarbiat Modares University in 2003. He joined Shahid Rajaee Teacher Training University and currently he is the Head of the Faculty of Science. He is the Head of the Fuel Cell Research Laboratory of Shahid Rajaee Teacher Training University (Tehran, Iran). His research interests include Electrochemistry, Gas Diffusion Electrodes, Fuel Cell and Batteries and Chemistry Education.

    Abstract

    Nowadays, methanol fuel cell systems have been attracted research activities to investigate for facilitating methanol oxidation reaction. One of activities is concentrated on improving electro catalysts. Platinum is widely used as an electro catalyst. Nickel is also due to cost and availability, as well as good catalytic activity can be used as an electro catalyst. In the present study, the simultaneous presence of nickel and platinum as the electro catalyst for methanol oxidation reaction was investigated. First for fabricating of electrodes, nickel particles was deposited on carbon paper by cyclic voltammetry (potential range: -0.850 V to 0.3 V vs. Ag/AgCl, scan rate 50 mV s-1, cycle number 30, room temperature) as the electrochemical deposition method in three electrode half-cell system. Then, platinum and nickel particles simultaneously was deposited on prepared nickel layer by cyclic voltammetry (potential range: -0.850 V to 0.650 V vs. Ag/AgCl, scan rate 50 mV s-1, cycle number 30, room temperature). At electro deposition processes the nickel concentration was varied 10 up to 60 mM and platinum concentration was fixed at 1 mM. The fabricated electrode was investigated for methanol oxidation reaction in three electrode half-cell system by the electrochemical methods like as linear sweep voltammetry, cyclic voltammetry and impedance spectroscopy. Accordance SEM results, the electro catalysts are formed as nanostructure on carbon paper. The fabricated electrode has been shown good electro catalytic activity for methanol oxidation reaction in alkaline media. Based on electrochemical analysis of prepared electro catalysts, the optimum concentration of nickel in electro deposition solution was determined at 50 mM.

  • Electrochemical sensor based on multi-Walled carbon nanotubes – Boehmite nanoparticle composite modified electrode
    Speaker
    Masoumeh Ghalkhani
    Shahid Rajaee Teacher Training University
    Iran
    Biography

    Masoumeh Ghalkhani received her MS degree in 2005 and PhD degree in 2010 from Sharif University of Technology (SUT) with specialization in the preparation and application of chemically modified electrodes. At present, she is an Assistant Professor of Chemistry at Shahid Rajaee Teacher Training University, Tehran, Iran. Her current research interests include electroanalytical chemistry, bio-electrochemistry, and sensors and mainly focused on fabrication and application of modified electrodes and biosensors.

    Abstract

    A sensitive electrochemical sensor was developed for the analysis of dobutamine (Dob) using a glassy carbon electrode modified with multi-walled carbon nanotubes – boehmite nanoparticle composite (BNP-MWNTs/GCE). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used for the characterization of synthesized BNPs and the morphology of BNP-MWNTs on the surface of GCE. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the BNP-MWNTs/GCE exhibited higher peak current than bare GCE due to synergetic effect of BNPs and MWCNTs on the electrochemical oxidation of Dob. The effect of various experimental parameters such as pH, scan rate, accumulation time on the voltammetric response of Dob was studied and optimized. A wide linear range from 0.005 to 1.0 µM with a low detection limit of 8.9 nM was found for voltammetric quantification of Dob. The prepared sensor exhibited the acceptable repeatability, high reproducibility along with good stability which makes it appropriate candidate for determination of Dob in pharmaceutical preparations.

  • Fabrication of highly selective sensor based on Mn- Doped ZnO nanostructures
    Speaker
    Azam Anaraki Firooz
    Shahid Rajaee Teacher Training University
    Iran
    Biography

    Azam Anaraki Firooz received MSc and PhD degrees in Inorganic Chemistry from Tarbiat Modares University in 2005 and 2010, respectively. She jointed Shahid Rajaee Teacher Training University in Tehran in 2011. Her research interests include the effect of morphology and additives on sensing and photocatalytic functions of oxide nanostructures.

    Abstract

    1 mol% of Mn -, Fe- doped and single phase hexagonally plate ZnO have been synthesized by a simple low temperature hydrothermal method using D-ribose as a template. The influence of the doped specious on structural, optical and sensing property was studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), UV–vis spectra, photoluminescence (PL) and gas sensor characterization system. The results show that the doped specious have significant effect on morphology, crystallite size, photoluminescence and sensing properties. Mn- doped ZnO sensor shows selective response to acetone in presence of CO and ethanol while, Fe-doped ZnO does not show considerable response to CO, ethanol and acetone gases. Probably, the crystal defects are detected by photoluminescence account for the different sensing behaviors. A possible mechanism of how a doped ZnO-based sensor response to the target gas is also proposed by density functional theory (DFT) calculations.

  • Identification and estimation of nonlinearity in nanometrology system resulting from target velocity
    Speaker
    Saeed Olyaee
    Shahid Rajaee Teacher Training University
    Iran
    Biography

    Saeed Olyaee received his BSc degree in Electrical Engineering from University of Mazandaran, Babol, Iran, in 1997 and MSc and the PhD degrees in Electrical Engineering specializing in Optoelectronics from Iran University of Science and Technology (IUST), Tehran, Iran, in 1999 and 2007, respectively. He has established the Nano-photonics and Optoelectronics Research Laboratory, NORLab, in 2006 and currently, he is the Head of NORLab and Dean of Electrical and Computer Engineering Faculty, Shahid Rajaee Teacher Training University SRTTU), Tehran, Iran. He presented and published more than 100 scientific conference and journal papers, book, and book chapters, and currently, he is Technical Manager of Journal of Electrical and Computer Engineering Innovations (JECEI) and member of scientific committee of several national and international conferences. His main research interests include “Nano-displacement measurement, optical instrumentation and photonic crystal fibers”.

    Abstract

    In the present study, we investigate the structure of Developed Three-Longitudinal Mode Heterodyne Interferometer (DTLMI). Then, the output relations of each part are obtained considering Polarizing Beam Splitter (PBS) leakage. According to this computational study, the identity of error in phase measurement is examined through simulations. According to these investigations, the error is as frequent changes around the real value and its amplitude is proportional to the leakage of Polarizing Beam Splitter (BPS). The results reveal that 2% leakage causes 3.18 nm and 2.05 nm errors at high and low target speeds, respectively. Target speed is also a determinant factor in the generated error type, so that in the speeds higher than a particular limit, 45 degree shift is seen in the periodic error and the amount of error will be larger.

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